Spirulina is a blue-green algae that is loaded with beneficially nutrients and antimicrobial properties. It is 65% protein and contains all of the essential amino acids, as well as several of the nonessential amino acids. It has a net protein utilization rate of 50-60%.
Spirulina is high in bio-available iron, which makes it an excellent option for vegans at risk of developing anemia. High concentrations of B vitamins allows it to provide lasting energy, as well as stress and hormone support. Although it is often advertised as being a rich source of plant-based B12, it is not actually believed to be a form that is usable in the human body.
Spirulina is a great source of anti-inflammatory essential fatty acids (omegas 3, 6, and 9) and antioxidants; including beta-carotene, selenium vitamin E, and lutein to name a few. These antioxidants fight free radicals in the body, which lead to inflammation, allergy symptoms, and disease. It is also a great source of the powerful disease fighting antioxidant enzyme, Superoxide Dismutase. Additionally, spirulina is capable of binding to heavy metals in the body and helping to remove them. It is extremely high in chlorophyll, which aids in removing toxins from the blood and boosts immunity.
I am just getting back in the habit of adding spirulina to my water, as I have been feeling exhausted and think that I may be lacking iron in my diet. I definitely wouldn’t recommend tasting it on its own, but in a nice big glass of water it is actually not so bad. You can also try adding it to your green smoothies, fresh pressed juices, or simply buying capsules of it to take with meals.

Spirulina is a blue-green algae that is loaded with beneficially nutrients and antimicrobial properties. It is 65% protein and contains all of the essential amino acids, as well as several of the nonessential amino acids. It has a net protein utilization rate of 50-60%.

Spirulina is high in bio-available iron, which makes it an excellent option for vegans at risk of developing anemia. High concentrations of B vitamins allows it to provide lasting energy, as well as stress and hormone support. Although it is often advertised as being a rich source of plant-based B12, it is not actually believed to be a form that is usable in the human body.

Spirulina is a great source of anti-inflammatory essential fatty acids (omegas 3, 6, and 9) and antioxidants; including beta-carotene, selenium vitamin E, and lutein to name a few. These antioxidants fight free radicals in the body, which lead to inflammation, allergy symptoms, and disease. It is also a great source of the powerful disease fighting antioxidant enzyme, Superoxide Dismutase. Additionally, spirulina is capable of binding to heavy metals in the body and helping to remove them. It is extremely high in chlorophyll, which aids in removing toxins from the blood and boosts immunity.

I am just getting back in the habit of adding spirulina to my water, as I have been feeling exhausted and think that I may be lacking iron in my diet. I definitely wouldn’t recommend tasting it on its own, but in a nice big glass of water it is actually not so bad. You can also try adding it to your green smoothies, fresh pressed juices, or simply buying capsules of it to take with meals.